Monthly Archives: June 2015

Patience

5+ years ago when I started this personal blog, the first post I wrote was the definition of patience.

For all dark tunnels and valleys we endure, for all trials and hardships that occupy our minds, for all anxieties and uncertainties that consume our mental space, it’s hard to remember that with time do all things pass, and with enough time, you may even look back and wonder why you worried so much.

I personally need to figure out how to uproot the occasional dark and viral issues that swallow my trains of thought every morning and night. And typically these viral issues always involve one element; I’ve never stressed about finances much, and career. Well, at least they’ve never kept me up at night.

Cycles

Ive been here so many times before, and I imagine I’ll find myself here so many times more. It’s that dark tunnel that I’ve come to know so well but inevitably have to pass through each time I find myself in this cycle.

2015 in 30 colors

This year marks the year that (to my record) I’ve had the fortune of visiting 30 of the world’s unique countries. The irony here is that I’ve had my fill only moments before I depart for my next long term adventure abroad. And I sit here writing this hundreds of miles from home.

Here are some notes I took while bouncing between Madagascar, Colombia, Japan, and Thailand:

* In Madagascar, 80% of the population lives under $1.50

* In Madagascar, there’s little to no infrastructure. Children ran freely on the streets. The country was beautiful but so unfortunately economically underdeveloped. How a lack of view can make geographically distant realities nothing more than sentences on paper. The reason we need reminders is because, for good or bad, we are blessed with the ability to forget. And usually we need consistency in reminder to help us remember to appreciate, respect, and do something with the opportunities that we’ve been given.

* A constant change in routine and/or lack of habitual patterns and standard operating procedures requires heavy brain activity to adjust to novel behaviors. Habits are like ready-access stored procedures ready to fire on cue. If you can exist on 75% stored procedure and 25% novel thought and change, I imagine you would afford your brain the mental space and energy to really fine tune current day issues/decisions/patterns. I once had a friend who lived his life by the simplest of schedules that I had ever seen. He was also coincidentally one of the smartest people I have ever met. I wonder if that strict routine allowed him the mental capacity to excel in the non-mundane aspects of his life, rather than expending energy on inconsequential thoughts and non-habitual patterns.

* The dream of everybody is to be evaluated in a complex way as a human being. And the deepest core of every human being is a longing for respect, dignity, and a sense of being understood — and that’s in short supply.

* In travel, never has it been so apparent to me that the human condition deeply desires only that which it cannot have. When I’m traveling, I want so desperately to be home. And when I’m home, I want so desperately to be traveling. I imagine you could substitute “traveling” with any other action and it would stand true.

* Everything in Japan is oddly and fantastically cubicle. People are impossibly friendly and helpful. And the city is extremely clean. It’s like a Manhattan 2.0.

Never Have I

Had trouble sleeping for many day stretches at a time. I find myself consistently awake until 3am. An idle mind is bad news. “Mama need a house, baby need some shoes” – Ace Hood. I’m also getting old, and that reality is forcing me into mental territories I’ve typically found solace in not exploring.